Dogs

Best Dog Breeds for Runners

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What Dog Can Keep the Pace with Other Dogs?

Do you want to find the right dog running partner for your pup? It might surprise you to know that not all dogs can withstand the mental and physical demands of running. Running can cause heat stroke in some dogs, especially those with short noses or flat faces like Chihuahuas, Pugs, Boxers, Bulldogs, Shih Tzu, Shih Tzu, and Chihuahuas.

Keep in mind that puppies reach their peak ability at 12 months old. It is important to keep your puppy’s running time down.

Which dog breeds are able to keep up with runners? JT Clough, a professional dog trainer and marathoner, and Eliabeth Devitt, a veterinarian co-authored “5K Training Guide Running with Dogs,” which lists top running breeds and is categorized according to their running style.

Long Distance Runners

Dogs with medium builds are ideal for running long distances that exceed 10 miles.

  • German shorthaired pointers
  • Jack Russell Terriers
  • Vizslas
  • Weimaraners

Slow Distance Runners

A large breed dog is the best choice if you enjoy running long distances but prefer to do it slowly. It is important to take it slow, as larger breed dogs can become tired quicker.

  • Catahoulas
  • Dalmatians
  • Labrador retrievers
  • Standard poodles

Runners for short distances

Do you prefer a fast, short run? Take one of these muscular, lean dog breeds along with you. Each can sprint.

  • Beagles
  • English setters
  • Golden retrievers
  • Greyhounds
  • Labrador retrievers
  • Pit bulls

Speedy Runners

These dog breeds can run a mile in 7 minutes or less.

  • German shorthaired pointers
  • Greyhounds
  • Vizslas
  • Weimaraners
  • Whippets

Trail Runners

You will find dog breeds that are able to keep up with you when there are obstacles.

  • Belgian sheepdogs
  • Border collies
  • German shorthaired pointers
  • Vizslas
  • Weimaraners

There is no perfect dog breed for running. Keep your dog hydrated and look out for signs that he may be tired or injured.

High temperatures can cause heat stroke and dehydration, which can lead to death in dogs. In colder climates, asphalt, trails and pavement can become slippery and iced over, and your dog could sustain serious injuries to his paws.



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